Week 21

Week 21: Tuesday, March 31, 2020
John Donne

John Donne (1572-1631)
The life and work of John Donne is one of the most illuminating sources for understanding the transition in the English world as the English experienced the end of the long reign of Elizabeth I and the beginning of the Stuart era. It was a new world both exciting and frightening. Many Englishmen had never known another monarch other than Good Queen Bess. People looked to the Stuarts for a new beginning with both anticipation and fear.

LECTURE NOTES:
At the right you will will find a link to a one-page Chronology for the Seventeenth Century, which will be useful for the whole quarter.

And also a copy of one of John Donne's most famous works, "An Anatomie of the World" with meditations on the state of England at this moment when the old world of Elizabeth is passing and a new unknown world is ahead.

BRING YOUR COPY OF JOHN DONNE'S POETRY TO CLASS THIS WEEK SO WE CAN READ IT.

REQUIRED READING:

John Donne,

John Donne's Poetry,

W. W. Norton & Company; Critical ed. edition (January 4, 2007),

ISBN 0393926486

RECOMMENDED READING:

In 1603, the long reign of Elizabeth I came to an end and a new king brought a new dynasty to the English throne. The moment was filled with excitement and the promise of progress in a new century with new freedoms in a more open atmosphere than the controlled society dominated by the grand old queen. There is a new book on the last years of Elizabeth and the coming to the throne of James:

Leanda De Lisle,

After Elizabeth: The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle for the Throne of England,

Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (January 30, 2007),

ISBN 0345450469

22

Week 22: Tuesday, April 7, 2020
The Puritans

As we begin our Spring Quarter of our year-long study of the History of England we will take up the subject of the Puritans. This group had been forming for decades during the Elizabethan era, and they were already a problem for the government of the Virgin Queen. But it was in the Stuart era that this extremely energetic and cohesive group came to prominence and evolved into a political as well as a religious force. In order for us all to enter in to the world of English Puritans, I have assigned Paul Seaver's brilliant book Wallington's World. There is nothing better in all the literature of Puritanism. Paul Seaver was my professor at Stanford for Tudor-Stuart History and thus he is the guiding light behind our plan for these two Tudor-Stuart quarters of our course. Paul is not only a brilliant historian and fine writer, but he is also one of the finest human beings I have ever known. His kindness to me and to Bruce Thompson when we were both at Stanford working on our Ph.D.s (we both did Tudor-Stuart History as our secondary fields) changed our whole grad school experience. As Bruce and I listened to other History grad students complaining about their life and their advisors and all their problems, we would smile as we realized that our grad school experience was rather pleasant thanks to Paul Seaver. I will never forget the thoughtfulness that Paul showed to me as I approached the terrifying experience of Ph.D. orals. I can remember him saying to me: "You will get through this." It was all I needed to hear in order to keep going. And he was right; I got through it.

LECTURE NOTES:

17th Century Chronology at the right

REQUIRED READING:

Paul Seaver,

Wallington's World: A Puritan Artisan in Seventeenth-Century London,

Stanford University Press (January 1, 1988),

ISBN 0804714320

23

Week 23: Tuesday, April 14, 2020
King James I

KingJamesIn 1603, the long reign of Elizabeth I came to an end and a new king brought a new dynasty to the English throne. The moment was filled with excitement and the promise of progress in a new century with new freedoms in a more open atmosphere than the controlled society dominated by the grand old queen. The new king was James, King of Scotland, who is shown at the right in the excellent 1606 portrait by John de Critz now in the National Portrait Gallery in London.

LECTURE NOTES

At the right you will find Lecture Notes containing James I Biography and Seventeenth Century Chronology.

NO TIME FOR DVDs OR PICTURES
TONIGHT; TOO MUCH TO COVER.

RECOMMENDED READING

Alan Stewart,

The Cradle King,

St. Martin's Press; 1 edition (December 16, 2003),

ISBN 0312274882

24

Week 24: Tuesday, April 21, 2020
King Charles I

Charles I (November 19, 1600 – January 30, 1649) was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, from March 27, 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles is one of the most exasperating and tragic of all royal figures in the history of England. In one short reign he destroyed everything his Tudor predecessors had created. His execution was the most shocking event in the whole of the seventeenth century.

LECTURE NOTES:

English Civil War Chronology at the right.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Here is a fine biography of Charles.

C. Carlton,

Charles I,

Routledge; 2 edition (September 24, 1995),

ISBN 0415125650

25

Week 25: Tuesday, April 28, 2020
The English Civil War

From Wikipedia:
"The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. The first (1642 - 1645) and second (1648 - 1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third war of (1649 - 1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The Civil War ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651. The Civil War led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son Charles II, and the replacement of the English monarchy with the Commonwealth of England (1649 - 1653) and then with a Protectorate (1653 - 1659): the personal rule of Oliver Cromwell. The monopoly of the Church of England on Christian worship in England came to an end, and the victors consolidated the already-established Protestant Ascendancy in Ireland. Constitutionally, the wars established a precedent that British monarchs could not govern without the consent of Parliament although this would not be cemented until the Glorious Revolution later in the century."
During our week dedicated to the events of the English Civil War we will also examine the fascinating historiographical debate that has flourished especially since World War II.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Lawrence Stone,

The Causes of the English Revolution,

Routledge; 1 edition (April 21, 2017),

ISBN 1138700339

Christopher Hill,

The World Turned Upside Down,

Penguin Books (December 4, 1984),

ISBN 0140137327

26

Week 26: Tuesday, May 5, 2020
John Milton

John Milton, 1608-1674, was the most important writers of seventeenth-century England and an important politician as well. His Paradise Lost (1667) is viewed as one of the greatest epic poems of all time. We will read some of his essays.

If you would like to read the opening book of Paradise Lost, you can find a link over on the right side of this page within the sidebar. In the first paragraph, Milton refers to the Sinai mountain top and to the Shepherd. Here he is referring to Moses receiving the commandments on Mount Sinai (Book of Leviticus).

LECTURE NOTES:

At right on the Sidebar, with chronologies etc., you will find Book I of Paradise Lost.
John Milton Biography
English Civil War Chronology
Paradise Lost Book One

REQUIRED READING:

John Milton,

Areopagitica, and of Education,

Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (January 15, 1951),

ISBN 0882950576

RECOMMENDED READING:

Barbara Lewalski,

The Life of John Milton,

Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (November 8, 2002),

ISBN 1405106255

For those of you who would like your own copy of Paradise Lost, here is an excellent edition:

John Milton,

Paradise Lost,

Philip Pullman,

Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (December 15, 2008),

ISBN 0199554226

27

Week 27: Tuesday, May 12, 2020
Oliver Cromwell and the Republic

Oliver Cromwell.
The fall of monarchy.
The advent of a Puritan republic.
England in the mid-seventeenth century.

LECTURE NOTES:

English Civil War Chronology at right.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Antonia Fraser,

Cromwell,

Grove Press; 1st Grove Press ed edition (March 30, 2001),

ISBN 0802137660

28

Week 28: Tuesday, May 19, 2020
King Charles II

From Wikipedia:
"Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. His father Charles I had been executed in 1649. Following the English Civil War; the monarchy was then abolished and England, and subsequently Scotland and Ireland became a united republic under Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector, albeit with Scotland and Ireland under military occupation and de facto martial law. In 1660, shortly after Cromwell's death, the monarchy was restored under Charles II. He was popularly known as the 'Merry Monarch' in reference to his cheerful disposition."

RECOMMENDED READING:

Is there anything better than a royal biography written by the royalty of English biography writing Lady Antonia Fraser?

Antonia Fraser,

Royal Charles: Charles II and the Restoration,

Dell (1980),

ISBN 0440569605

29

Week 29: Tuesday, May 26, 2020
The Crisis of the 1680's

As England entered the 1680's it faced a constitutional crisis as grave as that which had split the nation in the 1640's. King Charles II had no son or daughter to succeed him and therefore the only legitimate successor was the king's brother James, Duke of York. James had complicated such a succession by converting to Roman Catholicism and thereby confronting the Parliament with the possibility of the first Roman Catholic monarch since Queen Mary I. Parliamentary leaders were unalterably opposed to this and for the next several years the issue would be argued in the series of "Exclusionary" bills all of which were destained to be vetoed by King Charles.

RECOMENDED READING:

Samuel Pepys Diary is one of the finest examples of private memoires to come down to us from the beginning of the Modern Age. Our enjoyment of the Diary will be augmented by our experience with other writers of private recollections such as Cicero, Abelard, Heloise, Alessandra degli Strozzi, Castiglione, Veronica Franco and others.

Samuel Pepys,

A Pepys Anthology,

Robert and Linnet Latham,

University of California Press; Revised ed. edition (May 18, 2000),

ISBN 0520221672

30

Week 30: Tuesday, June 2, 2020
James II & the Glorious Revolution

June 30, 1688- A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the "Immortal Seven", invite William and Mary to depose James II of England.
October 27 - King James II of England fires minister Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland
November 5 - Glorious Revolution begins: William of Orange lands at Brixham but James II of England is prevented from meeting him in battle because many of his officers and men desert to the other side.
November - Hearing that William has landed in England, Louis XIV declares war on the Netherlands. He does not attack the Netherlands but instead strikes at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire with about 100,000 soldiers.
December 11 - After a series of defeats King James II of England flees England for France.

All

Week 21: Tue., Mar. 31, 2020
John Donne

John Donne (1572-1631)
The life and work of John Donne is one of the most illuminating sources for understanding the transition in the English world as the English experienced the end of the long reign of Elizabeth I and the beginning of the Stuart era. It was a new world both exciting and frightening. Many Englishmen had never known another monarch other than Good Queen Bess. People looked to the Stuarts for a new beginning with both anticipation and fear.

LECTURE NOTES:
At the right you will will find a link to a one-page Chronology for the Seventeenth Century, which will be useful for the whole quarter.

And also a copy of one of John Donne's most famous works, "An Anatomie of the World" with meditations on the state of England at this moment when the old world of Elizabeth is passing and a new unknown world is ahead.

BRING YOUR COPY OF JOHN DONNE'S POETRY TO CLASS THIS WEEK SO WE CAN READ IT.

REQUIRED READING:

John Donne,

John Donne's Poetry,

W. W. Norton & Company; Critical ed. edition (January 4, 2007),

ISBN 0393926486

RECOMMENDED READING:

In 1603, the long reign of Elizabeth I came to an end and a new king brought a new dynasty to the English throne. The moment was filled with excitement and the promise of progress in a new century with new freedoms in a more open atmosphere than the controlled society dominated by the grand old queen. There is a new book on the last years of Elizabeth and the coming to the throne of James:

Leanda De Lisle,

After Elizabeth: The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle for the Throne of England,

Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (January 30, 2007),

ISBN 0345450469

Week 22: Tue., Apr. 7, 2020
The Puritans

As we begin our Spring Quarter of our year-long study of the History of England we will take up the subject of the Puritans. This group had been forming for decades during the Elizabethan era, and they were already a problem for the government of the Virgin Queen. But it was in the Stuart era that this extremely energetic and cohesive group came to prominence and evolved into a political as well as a religious force. In order for us all to enter in to the world of English Puritans, I have assigned Paul Seaver's brilliant book Wallington's World. There is nothing better in all the literature of Puritanism. Paul Seaver was my professor at Stanford for Tudor-Stuart History and thus he is the guiding light behind our plan for these two Tudor-Stuart quarters of our course. Paul is not only a brilliant historian and fine writer, but he is also one of the finest human beings I have ever known. His kindness to me and to Bruce Thompson when we were both at Stanford working on our Ph.D.s (we both did Tudor-Stuart History as our secondary fields) changed our whole grad school experience. As Bruce and I listened to other History grad students complaining about their life and their advisors and all their problems, we would smile as we realized that our grad school experience was rather pleasant thanks to Paul Seaver. I will never forget the thoughtfulness that Paul showed to me as I approached the terrifying experience of Ph.D. orals. I can remember him saying to me: "You will get through this." It was all I needed to hear in order to keep going. And he was right; I got through it.

LECTURE NOTES:

17th Century Chronology at the right

REQUIRED READING:

Paul Seaver,

Wallington's World: A Puritan Artisan in Seventeenth-Century London,

Stanford University Press (January 1, 1988),

ISBN 0804714320

Week 23: Tue., Apr. 14, 2020
King James I

KingJamesIn 1603, the long reign of Elizabeth I came to an end and a new king brought a new dynasty to the English throne. The moment was filled with excitement and the promise of progress in a new century with new freedoms in a more open atmosphere than the controlled society dominated by the grand old queen. The new king was James, King of Scotland, who is shown at the right in the excellent 1606 portrait by John de Critz now in the National Portrait Gallery in London.

LECTURE NOTES

At the right you will find Lecture Notes containing James I Biography and Seventeenth Century Chronology.

NO TIME FOR DVDs OR PICTURES
TONIGHT; TOO MUCH TO COVER.

RECOMMENDED READING

Alan Stewart,

The Cradle King,

St. Martin's Press; 1 edition (December 16, 2003),

ISBN 0312274882

Week 24: Tue., Apr. 21, 2020
King Charles I

Charles I (November 19, 1600 – January 30, 1649) was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, from March 27, 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles is one of the most exasperating and tragic of all royal figures in the history of England. In one short reign he destroyed everything his Tudor predecessors had created. His execution was the most shocking event in the whole of the seventeenth century.

LECTURE NOTES:

English Civil War Chronology at the right.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Here is a fine biography of Charles.

C. Carlton,

Charles I,

Routledge; 2 edition (September 24, 1995),

ISBN 0415125650

Week 25: Tue., Apr. 28, 2020
The English Civil War

From Wikipedia:
"The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. The first (1642 - 1645) and second (1648 - 1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third war of (1649 - 1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The Civil War ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651. The Civil War led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son Charles II, and the replacement of the English monarchy with the Commonwealth of England (1649 - 1653) and then with a Protectorate (1653 - 1659): the personal rule of Oliver Cromwell. The monopoly of the Church of England on Christian worship in England came to an end, and the victors consolidated the already-established Protestant Ascendancy in Ireland. Constitutionally, the wars established a precedent that British monarchs could not govern without the consent of Parliament although this would not be cemented until the Glorious Revolution later in the century."
During our week dedicated to the events of the English Civil War we will also examine the fascinating historiographical debate that has flourished especially since World War II.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Lawrence Stone,

The Causes of the English Revolution,

Routledge; 1 edition (April 21, 2017),

ISBN 1138700339

Christopher Hill,

The World Turned Upside Down,

Penguin Books (December 4, 1984),

ISBN 0140137327

Week 26: Tue., May. 5, 2020
John Milton

John Milton, 1608-1674, was the most important writers of seventeenth-century England and an important politician as well. His Paradise Lost (1667) is viewed as one of the greatest epic poems of all time. We will read some of his essays.

If you would like to read the opening book of Paradise Lost, you can find a link over on the right side of this page within the sidebar. In the first paragraph, Milton refers to the Sinai mountain top and to the Shepherd. Here he is referring to Moses receiving the commandments on Mount Sinai (Book of Leviticus).

LECTURE NOTES:

At right on the Sidebar, with chronologies etc., you will find Book I of Paradise Lost.
John Milton Biography
English Civil War Chronology
Paradise Lost Book One

REQUIRED READING:

John Milton,

Areopagitica, and of Education,

Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (January 15, 1951),

ISBN 0882950576

RECOMMENDED READING:

Barbara Lewalski,

The Life of John Milton,

Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (November 8, 2002),

ISBN 1405106255

For those of you who would like your own copy of Paradise Lost, here is an excellent edition:

John Milton,

Paradise Lost,

Philip Pullman,

Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (December 15, 2008),

ISBN 0199554226

Week 27: Tue., May. 12, 2020
Oliver Cromwell and the Republic

Oliver Cromwell.
The fall of monarchy.
The advent of a Puritan republic.
England in the mid-seventeenth century.

LECTURE NOTES:

English Civil War Chronology at right.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Antonia Fraser,

Cromwell,

Grove Press; 1st Grove Press ed edition (March 30, 2001),

ISBN 0802137660

Week 28: Tue., May. 19, 2020
King Charles II

From Wikipedia:
"Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. His father Charles I had been executed in 1649. Following the English Civil War; the monarchy was then abolished and England, and subsequently Scotland and Ireland became a united republic under Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector, albeit with Scotland and Ireland under military occupation and de facto martial law. In 1660, shortly after Cromwell's death, the monarchy was restored under Charles II. He was popularly known as the 'Merry Monarch' in reference to his cheerful disposition."

RECOMMENDED READING:

Is there anything better than a royal biography written by the royalty of English biography writing Lady Antonia Fraser?

Antonia Fraser,

Royal Charles: Charles II and the Restoration,

Dell (1980),

ISBN 0440569605

Week 29: Tue., May. 26, 2020
The Crisis of the 1680's

As England entered the 1680's it faced a constitutional crisis as grave as that which had split the nation in the 1640's. King Charles II had no son or daughter to succeed him and therefore the only legitimate successor was the king's brother James, Duke of York. James had complicated such a succession by converting to Roman Catholicism and thereby confronting the Parliament with the possibility of the first Roman Catholic monarch since Queen Mary I. Parliamentary leaders were unalterably opposed to this and for the next several years the issue would be argued in the series of "Exclusionary" bills all of which were destained to be vetoed by King Charles.

RECOMENDED READING:

Samuel Pepys Diary is one of the finest examples of private memoires to come down to us from the beginning of the Modern Age. Our enjoyment of the Diary will be augmented by our experience with other writers of private recollections such as Cicero, Abelard, Heloise, Alessandra degli Strozzi, Castiglione, Veronica Franco and others.

Samuel Pepys,

A Pepys Anthology,

Robert and Linnet Latham,

University of California Press; Revised ed. edition (May 18, 2000),

ISBN 0520221672

Week 30: Tue., Jun. 2, 2020
James II & the Glorious Revolution

June 30, 1688- A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the "Immortal Seven", invite William and Mary to depose James II of England.
October 27 - King James II of England fires minister Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland
November 5 - Glorious Revolution begins: William of Orange lands at Brixham but James II of England is prevented from meeting him in battle because many of his officers and men desert to the other side.
November - Hearing that William has landed in England, Louis XIV declares war on the Netherlands. He does not attack the Netherlands but instead strikes at the heart of the Holy Roman Empire with about 100,000 soldiers.
December 11 - After a series of defeats King James II of England flees England for France.